Glacier Waterton International Peace Park

We camped at the San-Suz-Ed RV Park, nestled among pine trees two miles from the west entrance to Waterton Glacier West Glacier, Montana, which, incidentally proved to be source of great home-made banana cream pie.  The glacier park is magnificent.. The scenic 'Going to the Sun' road brings you over the 2434m/8,000ft high Logan Pass. At the foot you drive alongside Lake McDonald and look up an almost sheer face   8565ft to the top. As you can see from the photos, the wild flowers are wonderful.


Lake Macdonald seen from the hillside.

An impressive carved wooden eagle.


Wild flowers in the Park


Views of Lake McDonald



Tour buses dating from the ealier days otif Waterton Park are still in use.

 
One of the smaller mammals to be found in the park


Pebbles in the Lake McDonald


Glacier Park Lodge

Yellowstone National Park

We drove to  Helena (the capital of Montana) via Butte,   Nevada City and Virgina City (an historic mining town).  Not much can be said about Yellowstone that has not already been said.  'Old Faithful' is as active as ever. The 1988 fire devastated over 80% of the park, and four  years of drought have added to the damage.. It will take  generations to recover its former glories.



Old Faithful, true to form still erupts regularly between 46 to 126 minutes.



Geysers, hot springs, fumaroles and mud pots are found in Yellowstone powered by magmatic heat from volcanic eruptions.



Bison are said to be bad tempered and dangerous so it seemed better to be content with a back view.

 An elk grazing despite the tourists.



Afternoon nap interrupted by photographer.


Yellowston Canyon


Yellowstone Falls


Yellowstone Lake

Teton National Parks

 

Bryce Canyon Natonal Park

The Colorado Plateau is home to the world's most spectacular sights with Bryce, Capitol Reef, Arches, Canyon Lands and the most spectacular of all, the Grand Canyon. Our choice for being the No. 1 national park to visit was Bryce Canyon. These photos will illustrate why.

Capitol Reef National Park

Travelling northeast on Hwy's 12 and 24 we passed some of the most magnificent scenery . As we climbed to a summit of over 8000ft/2500m every turn brought outstanding views.


Dead Horse Point/Canyonlands Natl't Park

The Green River


Arches National Park

Unfortunately the morning we visited Arches Natl Park it was overcast so the pictures do not do it justice.

Here is a view of our traveling home!

 
All the rocks are given fancy names which sometimes stretch the imagination too far. It think these were called 'The gossips'.

A storm brewing in the distance

Tourists like to have their pictures taken against in front of this arch.

 


Moab Golf Course


Natural Bridges National Monument

East of Blanding,  to Utah on Hwy 95, in the Abajo Mountains south of Canyon Nat'l Park we again climb to 8,000ft (2500m) to see this remarkable marble natural canyon. Here it is possible to climb down and walk around and through the arches and rock formations.


Monument Valley

We took a 2 1/2 hour tour with a Navajo Guide, Dan' who showed us this majestic place and gave us lots of information about how Indian reserves are governed.

 
Big horn sheep, sheltering from the heat of the day together with their sheep dogs
.

No, they aren't taking a nap! It's the most comfortable way to view the hole in the roof (next picture).


The Grand Canyon

As many times as I have visited this park, each time I find the views awesome. One is truly humbled by its vast beauty. The canyon is a gift that transcends what we know and comprehend with its great chasm carved over 600 million years. It is almost impossible to capture with the camera's eye.

There is not too much wild life about now because of the tourists but this deer seems unconcernedby human visitors


Sequoia Nat'l Park, California

These are the largest trees in the world, not the tallest, the largest. The base is over 100ft (30m) diameter and one of the branches or limbs can be  over 7ft (2.1m) in diameter. Average hight: 275ft/83m.

 

 

 


The only way to view a Sequoia without getting a crick in the neck.